Kabuto now integrates with Dropbox!

Working collaboratively on DropBox files is now easier than ever.  Link files from your Dropbox account directly into Kabuto, and share them with other team members in a secure environment. Team members can preview, @mention, and follow all linked Dropbox files just like any other document stored in Kabuto. 

To get started, simply sign in to Kabuto, select any Space, click “Add Files”, and select the Dropbox option. We hope you find this feature as useful as we do; give it a try and let us know what you think!

Kabuto's New File Sharing Web Application is Here!

You asked, we listened. We completely revamped the Kabuto web application to be faster, sleeker and even easier to use.

Stunning Redesign

From the color scheme and iconography to fonts and legibility, every aspect of the interface has been reconsidered to convey vital data at-a-glance.

Informative Dashboard

The all-new dashboard shows you the information that matters right away. A global feed brings each conversation across all your spaces together in one place.

Improved Navigation

Move through your spaces quickly and easily with our next-generation navigation bar. Filter, group and reorder spaces to find what you’re looking for with a single click.

The update is available now. Log in and experience the all-new product today.

Happy 10th birthday, Gmail

On Tuesday, April 1st, Gmail celebrated it's 10th birthday.  It's hard to remember how revolutionary Gmail was at the time. Time published an excellent retrospective which quotes the current Google PM: "If you look back to 2004, the big problems email users were facing were having to delete messages for lack of storage, not being able to find messages and crazy amounts of spam."Part of the brilliance of the original marketing concept was the multiple meanings of the G in Gmail.  Obviously, it was email from Google.  But the name also embedded the idea of giving users 1 GB of storage.  That was 500x the free storage offered by the leading webmail providers at the time -- Yahoo and Microsoft.

Yet a huge amount of storage by itself wasn't enough of a value-add.  In fact, one could argue that without a clever UX and search algorithms, more email storage might actually have been a burden.  Having 1 GB encouraged digital hoarding.  Google completed the usefulness of Gmail by applying it's best-in-class web search to email folders.  So even if a user saved every scrap of email whether trivial or important, Google search would surface the right message for her.  This reduced the cognitive load of constantly sorting all your messages into hierarchies of folders.

Gmail  eliminated the need for endlessly elaborate e-mail folder management. In our research at Kabuto, we've talked to email power users who were trained in email usage before 2004.  To this day, these users still meticulously sort emails into the correct folders, using a single inheritance model.  In contrast, Gmail popularized the concept of labels or tags, which allow the same message to be grouped in multiple categories simultaneously. (To be fair, Lotus Notes introduced this feature years earlier, but who really wants to use Notes unless they're forced to?)

Fast forward to 2014. After the vast improvements Gmail introduced to the way we use email, is email a solved problem?  Absolutely not. MG Siegler does a great job chronicling his multi-year struggle with email. He is far from alone.  Google and Dropbox recognize that email is still painful. They continue to experiment with new technical features that might help.  Although these enhancements fix the edges of the problem, I believe there's more of a core issue.  It's not the product implementation so much as the social norms of how we use email.

Gmail creator and and FriendFeed co-founder Paul Buchheit expresses the situation well: "The problem with email now is that the social conventions have gotten very bad...It's not a technical problem.  It can't be solved with a computer algorithm.  It's more of a social problem."

I believe that we will develop new practices, expectations, and tools to address those social problems .  Here’s hoping that on Gmail's 20th birthday, today's struggles with email are just a memory.

Are You Working on the Correct Version of a Document?

Now that I have your attention, take a minute and think about that question. Now let me present this scenario. You've collaborated on an important presentation with your team over the past few weeks. That document has been edited, proofed, iterated upon several times. I bet that same document has been sent to you and others via email within your organization as well as to outside consultants for their input. That email chain gets longer and longer. People get added and removed from that email chain. The document name gets revised and sometimes the tracking changes function is turned off. Does this sound familiar to you?According to a survey conducted by Harris Interactive:

  • 83% of knowledge workers suffer from versioning issues every day
  • 57% get confused over which is the right file
  • 56% have to manually merge edits from others
  • 48% email the wrong version to a boss, client or coworker
  • 47% work on the wrong version of a document

 

Kabuto can help you overcome these version control issues. Here's how:

A complete audit trail captures file history and catalogs past document versions.

  • Conversations around documents are captured alongside a list of document changes. You’ll never lose an edit or version of a file again.

Following

  • You can ‘Follow’ a document to subscribe to receive updates when a file is edited, viewed, or downloaded. When you email files, you don’t have any insight into whom or when it’s consumed.

 

Find the signal and avoid the confusion. Focused conversations lead to more accurate results. Take control of this process and don't be a statistic.

Jason

How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love the Like

How many times have you sent an email that only had a few letters of content?  Something like ok or got it or thx?  A million? A billion?  Hold that thought for a moment.This week, the new version of Quip re-introduces the Like button.  Kabuto has offered the social context of Likes for our team collaboration tool for awhile.  But credit where credit is due.  Quip's CEO Bret Taylor and his friends at FriendFeed introduced the Like button back in 2007.

Working together, Facebook and the FriendFeed team popularized the Like button. Nowadays, it's a lightweight way of showing approval across the web.  That's why we adopted the Like button here at Kabuto as part of our activity feed.

As I talk to our beta customers, I've noticed something interesting.  On Facebook, clicking Like indicates social approval.  In other words, your friends think your status update is funny or video of your kid is awesome. In contrast, Kabuto users use Like in a subtly different way.  They are using it to express acknowledgement in a business context.  Your coworker is saying I received your document or Yes I'll be sure to meet you at that time and place. Going back to the beginning of this post, the Like button within Kabuto replaces the endless email threads where people are just saying ok to each other.  A seemingly small feature that cuts down on a lot of useless work email.

On second thought, those emails aren't completely useless. They serve the important function of acknowledgement.  Someone who emails "ok" or "got it" is trying to close the loop; to say that the document or meeting location was received.   To say that you can stop worrying because you were heard. The real problem is that these tiny (but important) messages are adding to our email overload.

Which brings us back to the Like button in Kabuto.  It offers that essential acknowledgement in a much less intrusive way.  This little piece of UI has the same basic functionality as the Facebook Like button.  But it offers a completely different benefit. On Facebook, a Like might mean that People are impressed by my awesome vacation photos. On Kabuto, a Like would indicate My client got the updated meeting agenda.

Facebook offers social approval. Kabuto delivers peace of mind.

Dropbox is Trying to Buy the Future

Everyone knows that cloud storage is rapidly being commoditized. Google knows it. Box knows it. Dropbox definitely knows it.One year ago, Dropbox acquired Mailbox.  Earlier this week, we learned that Dropbox acquired Zulip.  These are critical acquisitions because Dropbox has the most to lose when the price of online storage goes to zero.  Mailbox was a slick mobile email client.  Zulip looks like an interesting approach to group chat and social communications in a work context. (Hard to say because they were still in private beta.)

Dropbox is trying to layer on communications to their core strength in synching documents across devices. Why are they doing this?  I'd say there are two reasons.

First, Dropbox needs to justify its $10B market valuation. That's a hard case to make when your only revenue comes from a commodity that will soon be given away for free. So Dropbox needs to offer more than plain-vanilla online storage.  It needs something (maybe many things) to turn its many free users into at least a few more paying customers.

Second, Dropbox recognizes that people who work together want more.  It's not enough to have documents stored at one place and then communication channels (whether chat, email, texting, Jira, or anything else) living somewhere else. We need to put documents and communications together in a smarter way.

People have moved from FTP to using services like Dropbox, Box, Skydrive/Onedrive, Google Drive (the names are beginning to run together...).  But they find that even as document management and storage has gotten easier and cheaper, you still need to send separate emails to notify your co-workers that you've uploaded, edited, or have comments on those documents.

Enter Kabuto.  From the beginning, we've helped people focus their work within specific spaces.  Each of these spaces concentrates the relevant people, documents, and communications into a single unified interface.  Looks like we'll see other companies like Dropbox following our approach soon.

6 Ways to Use Kabuto’s Activity Feed

Ever wonder if the person you sent a file to via email, actually read the document? Would you like to get instant feedback without cluttering your email inbox with short and time consuming notes? If you want to filter conversations and documents by using a particular topic, then Kabuto is the tool for you to use.Kabuto’s “Activity Feed” is a bulletin of conversation that occurs within a workspace. Regardless of permissions, all users have the same ability to view, post, and comment on content in the feed.

 

Hash Tags

Hash tags are user generated tags, that link to a list of conversations that contain the selected tag. The Kabuto feed supports the use of hash tag functionality in both posts and comments.

 

Creating a Hash Tag

Any alphanumeric collection of text that appends the ‘#’ mark will automatically generate a hash tag. Clicking a tag will open a modal that displays any matching post or comments from across your workspaces.

 

@Mentions

@Mentions make it simple to have a back-and-forth conversation between the workspace's users. To initiate an @mention, type the '@' symbol in the 'Post' or 'Comment' box to trigger a type-ahead drop down displaying the workspace's participants.

When a user’s name is selected, it will automatically render as a hyperlink, and send a notification to the mentioned user, alerting them of the post.

In addition to @mention of a username, Kabuto supports @mention of any file within a workspace. Mentioning a file will trigger a notification to all followers of the document.

 

Following

You can 'Follow' a document to subscribe to receive updates when a file is edited, viewed, or downloaded. When you email files, you don't have any insight into whom or when it's consumed. 

 

Deleting a Comment or Post

At any time, the author of a post or comment can permanently delete their contribution by clicking the drop down icon that appears at the top-right side of the conversation, and selecting “Delete Post”.

 

Liking a Post

To Like a post, click the ‘Like’ link below the respective post. This is a quicker and more efficient way to show approval or acknowledgment of a document.  Clicking the ‘Unlike’ link will retract the Like.

Kabuto. Because your attention is valuable.

Jason

The Importance of Context within Collaboration & Knowledge Management

March Madness has arrived and we are knee deep in our all of our business objectives. Of course, while we are busy doing our jobs, opportunities and challenges arise, ready for us to embrace especially when working collaboratively. The Kabuto team recently took the time to ask our Twitter community of social business and knowledge management professionals the following questions:

  • How important is context when collaborating with others in an organization?
  • How important is context within the knowledge management process of deciding what, where & when info gets shared?

 

Here are their responses:

  • @SocialBling: Context is very important. The path to it is this bit.ly/18ipHh2 and bit.ly/14stdpS
  • @georgemag: @Kabutoapp @jedpc @lovemorenow @getrichieb there is no collaboration without context
  • @jedpc: @Kabutoapp  Question for @jedpc – “How important is context when collaborating with others in an organization?" Absolutely key I would say!
  • @jackvinson: KM is all about context.
  • @rsamii: .@Kabutoapp info gets shared when there is trust. This is why KM is about PEOPLE + relations.

 

As you can see we received some inspiring answers! Thanks to everyone who submitted a response.  Knowledge management professionals are constantly working together and become innovative in order to solve issues that arise in the workplace. Kabuto is here to help.

Kabuto is the fastest and easiest way for teams to work together because it is a communication tool that gives context to their work. Conversations are concentrated within spaces that contain relevant documents. With just a glance at Kabuto’s mobile or web apps, you see the most important activity across your projects, whether it’s a new comment or a new file. Here are the features that will help you leverage your team’s collective intelligence.

  • Create workspaces and upload files for the team to share.
    • Each workspace within Kabuto is a secure environment, where you can share files, and communicate with your team.
  • Talk about your documents in the same place you store them.
    • Use hash tags to index and manage conversation threads. Call out specific users and files in the workspace by @mentioning them in a post or a comment.
  • A complete audit trail captures file history and catalogs past document versions.
    • Conversations around documents are captured alongside a list of document changes. You’ll never lose an edit or version of a file again.

 

Find the signal and avoid the noise. Kabuto frees you to go back to conversations without losing focus on your task at hand, within the proper context with the right team mates.

Jason

5 Reasons Why Focused Online Communication Can Help Your Business

We’ve all said it before and we’ll say it again. “I want to collaborate more with my colleagues.” We know that this process is beneficial not only for the people involved, but for the overall business. Don’t fret. There are other people within your organization that share your desire/thoughts, but find themselves without enough time. Yes we are bombarded with a lot of distractions, ranging from emails, texts, calls, tweets and updates. Now some of those distractions can be valuable, but you need to mine and piece together all of that data to paint a clear picture of what is going on around you. Don’t let data control you. The time is now for you to control data. Here are five reasons why focused communication can help you and your business.

  1. Save time – Focused conversations allows you to maximize your time by organizing your data in one central location. You always know where it is, and you don’t have go through the mundane task of having to look for bits and pieces of information across several platforms. Use the extra time you save to find answers with actions.
  2. Stay on topic – Being in the zone is great right. As a runner, I always look forward to the exact moment where I am able to deflect all of the distractions around me and just concentrate on the thought that pops in my head. Nothing around the environment I’m keeps me from changing my though or lose focus that is requiring my full attention. That same focus is essential in the business world in order to improve your product or ways to engage with you community.
  3. Share your ideas – Digital currency is measured by what you share, not by what you know. Your brilliant ideas with foster innovation within your organization, show your team that you are all in and constantly thinking about ways to make processes better.
  4. Social proof - When engaged in a focused conversation and working on documents with others, you are provided with visual context. You can see the most important activity across your projects, whether it’s a new comment or a new file. You can always go back to conversations without losing focus on your task at hand, within the proper context with the right team mates.
  5. New connections: As conversations evolve, new players may need to be added to the game. This will encourage connections across all levels and functions within your business. Find the right people to help reach your goal.

It’s time that we find the signal and avoid the noise. Jason

Meet the VP of Engineering for Kabuto

Sung Yong Chun has over 12 years of experience in delivering world-class software products in social media and enterprise search software solutions. As CTO of SocialSeen, Sung led the development of a platform that helps brands analyze, manage, and monetize their presence across social media.As VP of Engineering at TauMed (a social health education site), he led software development, hardware deployment, network design and administration, and interface design. As one of Autonomy’s first U.S. software developers, Sung played a major part in the company’s early success by leading new research and product development. Sung holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Why We Love Context (And You Should, Too!)

According to Merriam-Webster, the definitions of context are

    • the words that are used with a certain word or phrase and that help to explain its meaning
    • the situation in which something happens : the group of conditions that exist where and when something happens

 

In today’s world we are constantly bombarded with a great deal of messages from many different mediums. There is so much information and data for us to absorb, process and take action on. We often forget the situation or task at hand that we need to focus on due to the countless distractions we face during our work day. One example is the consistent misuse of email.

We use email today for communication, document tracking, and managing our tasks. Have you ever worked with your colleagues on a file, sending updates back and forth with email? The email threads get longer and longer, which leads to frustration, confusion and then anger. Different versions of the file are everywhere and you don’t know which one to work on? With email, the content is isolated and often taken out of context.

Kabuto is a communication tool that gives context to your work. Conversations are concentrated within spaces that contain relevant documents. With just a glance at Kabuto’s mobile or web apps, you see the most important activity across your projects, whether it’s a new comment or a new file. With just a tap, you can dive in to update, contribute, or edit files.

Find the signal and avoid the noise. Kabuto frees you to go back to conversations without losing focus on your task at hand, within the proper context with the right team mates.

Jason

Why You Should Collaborate: Help Your Company Succeed & Grow in 2014

Whether you know it or not, you do have a say in how well your company does this year. As we begin the New Year, now is the time to reflect on 2013 and learn from past business experiences. Did you and your colleagues really take advantage of the new business processes to make a significant difference in your organization? Are there ways that you can improve how information gets shared? Is there still a gap between you and your customers?To overcome these issues and become a more streamlined organization, collaboration is key. We used to be in a me-me-me society, but with advancements in technology, we have ushered in the “Sharing Economy”.  It’s not what you know; it’s what you share that is truly the backbone of successful employees – which ultimately lead to thriving organizations.

“Collaboration isn’t about giving up your individuality. Quite the opposite: it’s about realizing your potential. It’s about bringing your many gifts to the table and sharing them in pursuit of a common goal. It’s about bringing your ideas, your passion, your mind, heart, and soul to your leadership and culture.”

Meghan Biro, Smart Leaders and the Power of Collaboration

A sharing culture within the workplace leads to innovation. It spurs ideas within the organization to better themselves, the product, and the people they serve.  These ideas and thoughts don’t have to come from the top. Employees now have the opportunity to have their voice heard. Now there are tools and platforms that allow that to happen and it doesn’t have to be generated from a cubicle. Original thinking happens everywhere. It can happen during a commute, while reading a book in your home or while running 10 miles (my favorite).  Their “A-HA moment” can be conceived, stored, shared and celebrated from a mobile device. Those are powerful experiences that will foster innovation.

Thinking about workflows, processes and time are factors that play a key role in how a business becomes innovative and collaborative. The knowledge sharing  experience needs to break down the walls and connect employees with each other and with your customers at any time and location. Kabuto allows an open and transparent dialogue between employees globally, which will in turn make the work experience richer and more fulfilling for everyone involved. Take a look for yourself.

Jason

Get To Know The CTO of Kabuto

Kabuto is built by an extraordinarily passionate team that believes that collaboration can be enhanced through the use of beautiful software. We believe that data should be stored securely in the cloud, and that users shouldn’t have to worry about the privacy of their information, or the content they share.Gadi Ittah, CTO

Gadi Ittah has over 15 years of experience in technology leadership roles at global enterprise collaboration and communications software companies. Gadi has held senior engineering and product management positions at Mainsoft and Intertrust and was involved in developing world class messaging solutions at Microsoft and Good Technology.

Gadi also led the technology and engineering teams at Zero Gravity Technologies, a secure email solution acquired by Intertrust in 2001. Gadi holds a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Jason

Thoughts on IDC’s 2014 Business Technology Trends & Predictions

On December 3, 2013, IDC released their annual forward looking statements via the “Top 10 Technology Predictions for 2014.” According to their press release, “IDC's predictions for 2014 were heavily influenced by the 3rd Platform, the industry's emerging platform for growth and innovation built on the technology pillars of mobile computing, cloud services, big data and analytics, and social networking.” Companies and organizations are looking for ways to drive their business forward; staying top of mind in their network of customers/prospects and creating a valuable experience through their products. Recent advancements in technology, aka the 3rd Platform, allow these goals to be attainable in a nimble course of time.The entire list would make any technology aficionado excited about the future. However, there are three predictions that I would like to expand on. Ready? Here we go:

  1. “The mobile device onslaught will continue in 2014 with sales of tablets growing by 18% and smartphones by 12%.”
    • Take a moment and look around you. How many mobile devices do you see currently being used? Quite a few, right? Now ask yourself this. “Why are they being used?” These devices are connecting people with on-demand content, ideas, other people half-way around the world and information.  Your customers and employees want data that will drive their next course of action. Their “A-HA moment” can be conceived, stored, shared and celebrated from a mobile device. Those are powerful experiences that will foster innovation.
  2. “Cloud spending, including cloud services and the technology to enable these services, will surge by 25% in 2014, reaching over $100B. IDC explained the $100B figure includes software, services and cloud infrastructure.”
    • Welcome to the 2014 version of the cloud baby. 2013 was a learning experience for cloud computing, after a few outages put a dent into the emerging technology. Emerging is the key word there. The cloud will grow, get stronger and become more reliable ensuring its place in the business and consumer worlds. The cloud is around us, above us and changing how we do business even though we don’t “see it” in action. Embrace the cloud, celebrate the cloud and use it to your advantage.
  3. “Social technologies will become increasingly integrated into existing enterprise applications over the next 12-18 months. In addition to being a strategic component in virtually all customer engagement and marketing strategies, data from social applications will feed the product and service development process. IDC expects enterprise social networks will become increasingly available as standard offerings from cloud services providers. This will enable enterprises to further embed social into the workflow, rather than having a separate “social layer.”  IDC also predicts that by 2017, 80% of Fortune 500 companies will have an active customer community, up from 30% today.  By 2016, 60% of the Fortune 500 will deploy social-enabled innovation management solutions.”
    • Companies that harness the feedback from their customers and employees will have a tremendous advantage over their competitors that don’t become a social business. People do business with organizations that they trust. How do you build trust? Be transparent, inclusive and offer your community a voice – that is how you build trust. This can be done through social technologies that will expand your network and give you different perspectives that go beyond the office walls. Rawn Shah, Blogger, Forbes.com on Social Business, said it best:  “One thought duality remains: the word ‘social’ itself will fade into the normal operation of business, and the processes themselves are changed without having to refer to it as a separate idea.”

The future of work is here. Mobile collaboration breaks down organizational silos; creates opportunities to innovate and increase productivity.

Cloud + mobile + real-time messaging + social collaboration + storage + security = Kabuto.

Kabuto will change how people & organizations will create, share, and store content in a secure system. Learn how you can easily integrate Kabuto into your workflow.

Jason

The Top 24 Tweets of the Opening Keynote at Dreamforce ’13

On November 19, 2013, Marc Benioff, Chairman & CEO, salesforce.com, took the stage at Dreamforce ‘13 to deliver his opening keynote. As usual, he showed up with a lot of energy and flash. Did you see his shoes? They were “phenomenal.” Take a sip!As many of you know, there 135,000 registrants for the event.  Unfortunately I was not in attendance, but was able to see his keynote address via the livestream. I had the best seat in the house and I didn’t have to get in line an hour ahead of time. With my coffee in hand, laptop on my lap, I was ready to soak it all on. During the two hour extravagant and 80’s inspired keynote theme, there was a lot of “Chatter” in the Twittersphere. Instead of writing a full analysis of the opening keynote, I put a list together of the top 24 tweets that best captured the experience. Here there are:

  • "Collaboration is the ultimate revolution in the cloud #DF13" - @DetroitCityBiz
  • "Internet of Customers, Internet of Things, cloud, mobile - it's really about "connected" employees, partners, customers #df13" - @mfauscette
  • "Behind every device and tweet is a customer... Benioff Internet of Customers! #DF13" - @DaveMario
  • "1 to 1 customer relationships becoming more important with the so called Internet of customers." - @cmswire
  • "Summary of @saleforce #Dreamforce keynote: There is so much opportunity to improve customer service in every store and every product #DF13" - @alanlepo
  • "2/3rds of companies are unprepared for the social/mobile world. @Benioff" - @XtinaDunham:
  • "In future APIs give you access to everything" - Parker Harris #df13" - @zebonic
  • "Social and mobile is about the new lifestyle, not about technology. #DF13" - @ValaAfshar
  • "Every business in the world has to have an application. Sales, service, marketing, & customers all intertwined. #icmilive #df13" - @justinmrobbins
  • "Marketing is really important in the future." @parkerharris #df13 #jobsecurity" - @benkiker
  • "End users don't care about apps as "custom" or out of the box. They need something that works for their work. Period. #DF13" - @sellingtools
  • "Your platform is as good as it gets when it's run entirely on mobile - very true and the future of enterprise #DF13" - @baryshnikova
  • "Speed is the new currency of business #DF13" - @CRMFYI
  • "Move fast and be bold. Time to market and innovation is extremely important to success in biz today #DF13" - @kyleplacy
  • "The agility of the solution enables them to deliver business value" #df13" - @txcarolina17
  • "As an organization, you always need to be one step ahead and you can only do that by being close to your customers." @Philips #df13" - @LiveOps
  • "Mobile is a massive focus of keynotes #df13" - @cahaikes:
  • "It’s not enough to HAVE information. You need to be able to organize it, understand it, and act on it. #DF13 #salesforceLIVE" - @Mark_D_Slayton
  • "Innovative companies are those who respond to customers in the cloud, in social and in mobile.  #df13" - @newsrooms
  • "Technology has allowed your sales force to become a weapon at scale #df13" - @kyleplacy
  • "It's not about selling, it's about providing information. Engaging the customer #salestruth #df13 @Benioff keynote" - @toutapp
  • "The CMO will spend more on technology than the CIO by 2017 - @ScottDorsey via @Gartner_inc #df13 #keynote" @Paralee
  • "The smartphone has become the dashboard of our life #df13" @davidpwu
  • "Marketing is leading change in business to Internet of customers. Smartphone drove this revolution, giving us dashboard for our lives #DF13" @arati_k

Once you’ve glanced over the tweets, you will notice a motif of the keynote. Benioff repeatedly reminded us that we have entered a “Third Wave” of technology that is being driven by the cloud and mobile. This new wave of technology is fundamentally changing how data is created, shared and consumed. We at Kabuto couldn’t agree more. Welcome to the new era of collaboration.

Jason

10 Insightful Quotes from Top Social Business Leaders

If you are searching for a comprehensive list of today’s social business leaders, then look no further than Michael Brito’s list titled, “Top 25 Social Business Leaders That Influence Me.” As you can see, Michael, Group Director at WCG, a W2O Group company, has created a “Who’s Who of forward thinkers” in the growing social business & enterprise 2.0 landscape. Over the past few years, “working” as we know it, has changed dramatically. Due to perpetual innovation in technology, workers are now consistently connected with their colleagues and their clients. That’s a good thing and should be embraced within every organization and company to help drive their business to new heights.Being transparent and connected authorizes everyone to share their voice and expertise on a topic or situation discussed within and beyond the company walls. It creates an all-inclusive culture that is bonded together by shared goals or outcomes.  A community is formed, where the exchanging of information allows members to learn new ideas and access a greater diversity of perspectives. Michael’s list inspired me to get to know more about and learn from these leaders. Their viewpoints on why becoming a social and collaborative organization, takes a deep look into what the future of work will look like and how it will get there.

In the spirit of sharing and collaborating, I decided to read large amount content created by the Top 10 leaders and offer some quotes that stood out to me. I also included their Twitter handles in case you wanted to follow them and get more of their thoughts on the future of business.

  1. Rawn Shah: @rawn – “One thought duality remains: the word ‘social’ itself will fade into the normal operation of business, and the processes themselves are changed without having to refer to it as a separate idea.”
  2. Dion Hinchcliffe: @dhinchcliffe – “..interaction and collaboration amongst employees is the very lifeblood of the typical businesses.“
  3. Sameer Patel: @SameerPatel – “I’m of the thinking that most leadership styles give too much credit to good idea origination and by extension, “strategy”. I’ve always intently focused on crediting execution in my leadership roles. If you have a good idea, use it. If you have a way to improve on someone else’s idea, use that. Either way, move fast to execution. Rewarding an execution culture is far more useful in my book.“
  4. Chelsi Nakano: @chelsi – “What you really want Social Business initiatives to accomplish is an effect on behavior and the forming of real connections. “
  5. Mark Yolton: @MarkYolton – “Know your audience and what they value…focus there .”
  6. Sandy Carter: @sandy_carter - “Employee engagement drives client engagement.”
  7. Olivier Blanchard: @thebrandbuilder – “Social is something you are, not something you do.”
  8. Haydn Shaughnessy: @haydn1701 – “Cloud and mobile (and also peer-to-peer networks) enable us to do miraculous things like move massive amounts of data around at the press of a button.”
  9. Matt Ridings: @techguerilla - “To achieve an environment of effective collaboration for example requires ensuring certain traits are in place along with meaningful motivators.”
  10. Maria Ogneva: @themaria – “Isn't a Social Business basically a connected business — when people connect to people, ideas, resources and business processes? If connectedness is the mark of today’s society, then isn't Social Business just good business?”

Which of these quotes stood out for you? Are there other quotes that you think need to be on the list? Let us know via Twitter  - @KabutoApp

Jason

Are You Prepared for the Information On Demand Workflow?

Let’s face it. We want information and we want it now! Information provides us the ability to take action on a decision or adapt to any situation that you may find yourself in. No other tool in our recent lifetime has allowed us to consume the information we want, more so than the rise and proliferation of the smart-phone.A study analyzed by mobile technology consultant Tomi Ahonen and commissioned by Nokia, brought to life how integrated the smart phone has become in our culture. Here is a stat that stood out to, but did not surprise me. “In total, users check their smartphones an average of 150 times during a waking day of 16 hours, the research found.”  You know why that did not surprise me? That’s because I am one of the users that constantly checks their phone. My smart phone has become part of my fabric and when I don’t have it on me, I feel lost, vulnerable and unconnected. I can only imagine how people in business who are constantly on the road must feel if they forgot or lost their phone.

The anytime, anywhere workplace is knocking down the walls of the traditional workplace.  According to a Forrester study called, 2013 Mobile Workforce Adoption Trends, “..we characterize 29% of the global workforce as anytime, anywhere information workers -- those who use three or more devices, work from multiple locations, and use many apps. The is number has risen from 23% of the global workforce in 2011 and will continue to rise…” Even though the office walls are coming down, business processes and collaboration, can’t be compromised in today’s need to have it now attitude.

Information is great to have, but it how an organization shares and uses it with their colleagues is more important. The traditional process begins with getting all of the correct parties together in a room and work together (collaborate) on what appropriate steps to take. But what if you can’t get everyone together in that one room? Collaboration and team can still take place, but don’t you even dare say email. Email conversations can be taken out of context, are long, cluttered, and eventually fall into a situation where someone sends the wrong attachment that totally derails everyone’s train of thought.

Don’t limit yourself to that. The power of mobile and cloud is much powerful than just email. Why not collaborate in the same interface where you share your information? I’ll let that question sink in a minute. Here is an equation that I came up with to help you answer that:

Cloud + mobile + real-time messaging + collaboration + storage + security = Kabuto

Kabuto will change how people & organizations will create, share, and store content in a secure system. Technology has made us more and more efficient. I would advise you to take advantage of it and think outside the “box”. Find out how.

A New Collaborative User Experience Has Arrived

Organizations today are focused on becoming more of a collaborative business. That requires tools and software applications that will help reach that goal. Luckily for them, Kabuto is here to offer a seamless and secure user experience.Ever worked with your colleagues on a file, sending updates back and forth with email? The email threads get longer and longer, which leads to frustration, confusion and then anger. Different versions of the file are everywhere and you don’t know which one to work on? Kabuto’s mission is to solve this challenge. Why don’t we communicate and collaborate in the same place we store our files?

Designed for mobile first, Kabuto combines the essential components of real-time messaging, task management, and secure cloud storage into a single and easy to use product. With email, the content is isolated and often taken out of context. As we all know if you have pleasant and memorable experiences with any product or service, you are more than likely to keep using said product.

Thinking about workflows, processes and time are factors that play a key role in how a business becomes innovative and collaborative. The user experience needs to break down the walls and connect employees with each other and with your customers at any time and location. Kabuto allows an open and transparent dialogue between employees globally, which will in turn make the work experience richer and more fulfilling for everyone involved. Take a look for yourself.

Jason

3 Things I Learned at #DEMOFall 2013 - #KabutoApp

I attended my first ever Demo Fall 2013 Conference last week and it was eye-opening. It was my introduction to the start-up world that I always heard about in Silicon Valley stories and read about via #startuplife tweets. For those of you that don’t know the Demo Conference, it focuses on emerging technologies and new product innovations that are hand-selected from across the spectrum of the technology marketplace.The Kabuto team was thrilled to be chosen out of a thousand companies to participate and pitch our innovative product to the Demo Fall conference attendees. We were able to tell our Kabuto story via the main stage and provide intimate and detailed demonstrations on the pavilion floor.

Here are the top 3 things I learned at 2013 Fall Demo Conference:

    1. Software should not divide people in the workplace. Our CEO, Tauseef Bashir, took the stage on October 16, and gave the audience an in-depth view of how Kabuto will change how people & organizations will create, share, and store content in a secure system.
    2. Innovation is alive and well. Over the course of two days, 40 companies took the stage to showcase their solutions that are changing they way people work in this digital and mobile age.
    3. The start-up community is friendly and supportive. During the pavilion hours, many of our neighbors came over to introduce themselves and say hello. We talked about the conference, how things were going and of course the many, many, many, long hours everyone has put into their company’s products. The one thing that stood out for me was how encouraging everyone was. The community wished us and the rest of the DEMO Conference participants, well in the presentation phase of the event. It was a great feeling and we made a lot of new friends.

Here in Kabuto headquarters, we’re taking the momentum generated at the DEMO Conference, to help people and organizations imagine, create, inspire & lead. The end result: true business value. Welcome to a new era of collaboration.

Cheers,

Jason